Watts Branch Watershed, Summer 2014

A Green Dragon plant.  This is the less-common relative of the Jack-in-the-pulpit that also likes moist floodplain woods.

A Green Dragon plant. This is the less-common relative of the Jack-in-the-pulpit that also likes moist floodplain woods.

This is a female Broad-headed Skink, a larger relative of the Five-lined Skink.  This lizard can grow up to a foot long and it prefers to be in trees more than its smaller relative.

This is a female Broad-headed Skink, a larger relative of the Five-lined Skink. This lizard can grow up to a foot long and it prefers to be in trees more than its smaller relative.

Walking Fern--very rare in the Watts Branch watershed, is normally found on limestone outcrops.

Walking Fern–very rare in the Watts Branch watershed, is normally found on limestone outcrops.

Possible Leatherflower,  Clematis viorna. leaves.   This rare vine has small pink urn-shaped flowers in late spring and early summer.

Possible Leatherflower, Clematis viorna. leaves. This rare vine has small pink urn-shaped flowers in late spring and early summer.

The Watts Branch valley in late May.  Traces of a major flood in April can still be seen.

The Watts Branch valley in late May. Traces of a major flood in April can still be seen.

This is a young Broad-headed Skink. It is larger than the immature Five-lined Skink and had seven lines on its body.

This is a young Broad-headed Skink. It is larger than the immature Five-lined Skink and had seven lines on its body.

This is Violet Wood Sorrel, an attractive ground covering wildflower of late spring and early summer.

This is Violet Wood Sorrel, an attractive ground covering wildflower of late spring and early summer.

 

A Woodland Sunflower graces the edge of the stream in late summer

A Woodland Sunflower graces the edge of the stream in late summer

 

An Elephant''s Foot Plant also known as wild tobacco, growing along the Watts Branch floodplain.  This is a southern wildflower.

An Elephant”s Foot Plant also known as wild tobacco, growing along the Watts Branch floodplain. This is a southern wildflower.

 

In contrast to the above southern plant,  this large Sweet Birch, Betula lenta, is more typical of the Appalachians or New England.  It is growing on a north-facing slope along the lower Watts Branch.

In contrast to the above southern plant, this large Sweet Birch, Betula lenta, is more typical of the Appalachians or New England. It is growing on a north-facing slope along the lower Watts Branch.

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This entry was posted in Herps and mammals, Landscapes, Non-flowering plants, Trees, Trees, shrubs, and vines, Wildflowers and grasses. Bookmark the permalink.

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